Your Trusted Advisers

Tag: Employment Law (Page 2 of 2)

Employment Law Guide: Termination for Unsafe Conduct

Employers have an obligation to provide a safe place of work for all of their employees, as well as to ensure that no members of the public are endangered by their activities. When an employee breaches health and safety legislation or the health and safety policy of the company, the employer must always take this conduct seriously. Failure to do so can leave the employer open to both civil and criminal liability. Continue reading

Employment Law Guide: The Law on Breastfeeding in the Workplace

As we celebrate this years World Breastfeeding week, I am conscious of the inequalities of opportunity for breastfeeding mothers in the workplace and their babies. I am lucky enough to have recently returned after maternity leave to a workplace that is wholly supportive of breastfeeding. I have a nice private office where I can comfortably express milk as I work away, and colleagues who are unfazed by the whir of my double electric pump, as they pop in to my office for chats, and even bring documents from the printer so that I don’t have to unlatch the pump to do it myself. It feels uncomfortable to me that this is not a universal experience, given that breastfeeding up the age of two and beyond is both biologically normal and recommended by the World Health Organisation and most health experts. Continue reading

The Use of CCTV in the Workplace

Under GDPR, employers are entitled to monitor employee activity if they have a lawful basis for doing so and the purpose of their monitoring is clearly communicated to employees in advance-before any data is recorded the data subject must be warned. A system used to monitor the building for security purposes will usually be easy to justify. The use of CCTV systems in other circumstances – for example, to constantly monitor employees – can be more difficult to justify and could involve a breach of the Data Protection Acts. Should an employee object to the use of CCTV cameras in a particular area, the GDPR test  places the burden on the employer to demonstrate that it has “compelling legitimate grounds” for processing that override the employees’ rights, or for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims.

Continue reading

Newer posts »